Steering Wheel Wonderings

Steering Wheel Wonderings

Renault Triber AMT Offered in South Africa!


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Renault South Africa has expanded its seven-seater Triber range with the introduction of an automated manual transmission (AMT) variant.
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The self-shifting derivatives join the manual-equipped models that launched at Group 1 Renault in February 2020, with local sales having already pasted the 2 500 mark.
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Priced at R219 900 and available exclusively in flagship Prestige trim, the five-speed AMT variant commands a R10 000 premium over the equivalently specified five-speed manual derivative.
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As a reminder, the Prestige trim level includes items such as four airbags, a reversing camera, LED daytime running lights, 15-inch "flex" wheels, a third 12 V socket and keyless entry. An eight-inch touchscreen with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto compatibility.
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As with the manual models, power comes from a naturally aspirated 1,0-litre, three-cylinder petrol engine delivering 52 kW with 96 N.m to the front axle. The French firm says the AMT has been "specifically tuned for effortless driving in city traffic conditions".
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All models in the Indian-built Triber range feature a two-year/30 000 km service plan (with 15 000 km intervals) and a five-year/150 000 km warranty.
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  • Renault Triber Expression 1,0: R179 900
  • Renault Triber Dynamique 1,0: R193 900
  • Renault Triber Prestige 1,0: R209 900
  • Renault Triber Prestige AMT 1,0: R219 900
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Original article from: https://www.carmag.co.za/

Renault Triber: The New Affordable Seven-Seater

Until now, the Datsun GO+ was the only option of a seven-seater under R200 000. Renault’s Triber is here to keep the Datsun honest and it may just do more than that.

Rising vehicle prices mean that this headline only makes sense in 2020. When the Suzuki Ertiga was launched in 2018, it was launched with a starting price from under R200 000.

But today, Ertiga starts at R221 900 and so there remains just two players that can attest to offering seven-seaters below the R200 000 bracket. One of these is the brand new Renault Triber launched in South Africa.

Built in India, the Triber is built on the same platform as the Datsun GO. Triber has been quite successful in India, but will it continue that success here? Considering Renault South Africa’s penchant for choosing a product portfolio that seems to suit our market, that may well be the case with the Triber.

ONE ENGINE, ONE TRANSMISSION

The Renault Triber is launched with a three-cylinder, one-litre petrol engine and its mated to a five-speed manual transmission. That’s it.

The engine is good for 52kW of power and 96Nm of torque, which means it may be quite strained if you take full advantage of that seven-seat configuration. But it’s a motor we’re used to and its adequate enough for the purpose and price.

LOADS OF INFOTAINMENT TECH

Renault isn’t one to shy away from offering loads of infotainment tech in the most affordable models and this one is no different.

Featuring the Renault 8-inch MediaNav infotainment system on the high-spec models and a Bluetooth-enabled radio for the low-spec Expression model, you’ll be connected no matter what. Also on the higher-spec Triber Dynamique and Prestige models available at Group 1 Renault, is Apple CarPlay and Android Auto phone replication apps.

COMFORT FEATURES

Triber also offers power steering, power windows — front and back (excluding Expression model), aircon with vents and controls for the second and third rows too. Prestige models come with keyless entry and extra speakers for better sound quality.

THE SAFETY QUESTION

One of the biggest criticisms or at least observations of the lower end of the vehicle market in South Africa is that of safety.

Renault itself has had to deal with a number of questions surrounding the safety of its Kwid starter-pack model. One of the improvements to the new Kwid that was launched late in 2019, was in this very area. Datsun has suffered the same questions. So what of the new Triber then?

It is offered with pre-tensioning seatbelts in the front, seatbelts for second-and third-row passengers, ABS and airbags for the driver and passenger. Prestige models add side airbags too. Emergency lock retractors are also fitted which will unlock the doors if a crash occurs.

SPACIOUS AND PRACTICAL

Triber has clearly been built with space and practicality in mind. It’s evident in what they call "EasyFix" seating which means you can remove seats quite easily to accommodate any number of configurations (up to 100) if this is needed.

In the five-seat configuration, the Triber boasts a class-leading 625 litre of boot space and that is discounted to 85 litres when the third row is in place.

The cabin is also littered with a number of smaller little compartments for storage, including a cooled centre console, two glove compartments and even the little drawer under the front seats…so French.

SUV RIDE HEIGHT

With a 182mm ground clearance at the front, the Renault Triber is being dubbed an SUV. It’s not entirely true of the acronym, but there are some benefits to a raised ride height, including an ability to go and park in a few extra places.

It’s the thing that motoring companies do these days to increase sales – raise the ride, slap on some cladding and call it an SUV. Triber is exactly that.

The new Renault Triber is available throughout the country, sold with a two-year Service Plan and a five-year/150 000km warranty.

It’s this combination of affordable pricing and perceived added value in the service plan and warranty that has won over so many young and new buyers into the Renault stable and in fact into motoring "freedom".

THE FULL LINE-UP WITH PRICING

  • Renault Triber Expression: R179 900
  • Renault Triber Dynamique: R193 900
  • Renault Triber Prestige: R209 900


Article from: https://joiedevivrevehicles.tumblr.com/post/637014261210726400/renault-triber-the-new-affordable-seven-seater

Renault Clio: A Very Mature Car

Mark five and almost 30 years of Renault Clio, is what it is. Yes, v1.0 of Renault’s supermini was launched way back in 1990. What we have here is definitely a new, new Clio though, spun from a shared platform called CMF-B (Common Module Family -B), the use of which is said to deliver improvements in space, safety, weight-saving and tech. Which it does, but more of that in a minute.
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Outside it’s shorter than before - though the 12mm reduction in length isn’t all that obvious - a touch wider and lower, but with more space, load capacity and general volume inside. Noticeably more space, in fact, and it feels more capacious upfront, though the rising window line makes it a little less airy stuffed in the back. There are LED headlights across the range, Renault citing safety benefits, and ‘C’-shaped daylight running lights. There are sharper creases, bonnet feature lines, the usual Clio hidden rear door handles up in the C-pillar, a big Renault badge in the front grille, some nice horizontal lines that widen the car visually. It’s all very clean and crisp, without being particularly scary or revolutionary. If Laurens van den Acker’s (Senior VP, Corporate Design at Renault) intent was to clean up a MkIV Clio, then the brief has been exceeded. But that was exactly the brief: the Clio has been Europe’s best-selling B-segment supermini since 2013, so any scary external revolution really wasn’t on the cards - this is still a familiar Clio, tidied up and made contemporary.
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And there are some really decent changes, including a leaps-and-bounds better interior (see ‘On the inside’) and new engines. We’ll get a very clever E-Tech hybrid in 2020, but for the moment there’s a choice of four ICE motors: a pair of 1.0-litre three-cylinder petrols (Sce 75 and TCe 100) with 70 and 98bhp respectively, a warm-ish 1.3-litre TCe 130 four-cylinder petrol with - you guessed it, 130PS (128bhp) - and a 1.5 Blue dCi 85 four-cylinder diesel with 83bhp. The lower-engined petrol variants get a five-speed manual, the diesel a six, and the faster one a seven-speed dual-clutch auto. The trims are Play, Iconic and R.S.Line, the latter a nod to the sportier Renaults, the others variations of kit. It’s a handsome enough, decently-sized supermini, that’s more efficient and a bit cleverer than before. Good.
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If you wondered where all the real newness was in the new Clio, then Renault seems to have stuffed it all inside. Because where it really scores is with its new interior, which is several jumps ahead of the old one. Renault calls it the ‘Smart Cockpit’, and the first things you notice are the 9.3-inch infotainment screen stuck up in the middle of the console portrait-style. Rotary knobs for air-con and ‘piano buttons’ for other functions are handily perched beneath, and the gearstick is pushed up into the right place in a semi-floating console just below that. In front is another small TFT instrument cluster - there’ll be a 10-inch optional version next year - and a generally very agreeable layout.
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There are better materials, much nicer and more comfortable seats - especially for taller drivers - and some really nice attention to detail. The steering wheel is a touch smaller, for instance, and features a smaller airbag. You can see where bare millimetres have been shaved (the steering column is slimmed down, making more room for knees), and get the feeling that Renault really has tried to hone this one along with the more obvious headline changes.
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In fact, with some of the different colours of panel available at Group 1 Renault, the interior has turned out to be the Renault Clio’s high point - you’ll almost forget that you’re in a supermini at all. There’s even a choice of eight different colours of ambient lighting, and enough options to satisfy any inveterate button-pusher. It has to be mentioned that you must spec lighter-colours in here though - all the cars on the launch had lovely (and expensive-feeling) options, so we’ll reserve full judgement until we see a base ‘Play’ with nothing on it. It might be quite a bit less fun.
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Article sourced from: https://www.topgear.com/

Renault Duster Prices Discussed


The Renault Duster is available at Group 1 Renault in the following variants (listed with their respective prices): Expression 1.6 4×2 from R289,900, Expression 1.6 4×2 from R289,900, Dynamique 1.5dCi 4×4 from R361,900, TechRoad 1.5 dCi 4X2 from R324,900, TechRoad 1.5 dCi EDC from R361,900, Prestige 1.5dCi EDC from R374,900.
*Pricing correct at time of blog’s publishing.



Article sourced from: https://joiedevivrevehicles.tumblr.com/post/635113434943455232/renault-duster-prices-discussed

Renault Service Centre Shares Tips

Hopefully, you’re already having your Renault serviced at one of the Renault Service Centers near you. We share some tips straight from a certified Renault Service Center to ensure your Renault always stays in tip-top shape.
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EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT YOUR TYRES
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Tyres are part of the "Safety Triangle" along with brakes and shock absorbers. They are the only point of contact between your vehicle and the road!
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In order not to damage your tyres and ensure your safety, we recommend that you carry out:
- A cold pressure check every month and before every long journey
- A regular check of the wear of your tyres using the wear indicator located in the tyre grooves
- The changing of your tyres in pairs in case of wear have the new tyres fitted in the rear
- The balancing and parallelism adjustment if needed
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EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT AIR CONDITIONING
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Air conditioning is far more than hot or cold air. Demisting efficiently, treating the air, regulating the temperature as you want it, air conditioning has an important role in your car.
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WARNING SIGNS
- You notice a decrease in the efficiency of the cooling or heating of the passenger compartment
- You have allergies (sneezing, coughing, irritation) when you use it
- The passenger compartment smells unpleasantly
- Condensation remains on the windows
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If you notice one of these signs, have your air conditioning checked in one of our workshops. Our experts are on hand to advise you.
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EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT SHOCK ABSORBERS
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Shock absorbers are part of the "Safety Triangle" along with brakes and tyres. They are continuously in use, therefore it is very important to have them checked regularly to ensure good road-holding and driving comfort.
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EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT BRAKING
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Brakes are used during every journey and they are one of the most important elements in your vehicle. By regularly maintaining your brakes, you will maintain your safety, that of your passengers as well as that of other road users. This is why Renault offers you various fixed prices.
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If you’re looking for a reliable, certified Renault Service Centre near you - simply visit a Group 1 Renault workshop.
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Article sourced from: https://www.renaultretail.co.za/

Renault Kwid 2020 vs 2015 Renault Kwid Comparision

Renault came up with the BS6 upgraded facelifted Renault Kwid 2020 earlier this year, with the facelift on Group 1 Renault showroom floors late 2019. Despite being launched at a time when the automotive industry was going through a ‘slowdown period’ the Kwid was still able to garner respectable sales numbers for the French automaker in India and increasing YoY sales figures alongside the Renault Triber in the country.
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Renault Kwid 2020 Engine

Specifications
2020 BS6 Kwid
Engine
0.8-litre three-cylinder , 1.0-litre three-cylinder petrol
Power
54 hp, 68 hp
Torque
72 Nm, 91 Nm
Transmission
5-speed manual gearbox, 5-speed AMT
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The power output from both 0.8-litre and 1.0-litre motors despite the BS6 upgrades remains the same as the BS4 engines. The 0.8-litre still produces 54PS and 72Nm while the 1.0-lire engine churns out 68PS and 91Nm of power and torque figures. The claimed mileage is around 21-22 km/l from the updated engine.
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Renault Kwid 2020 vs 2015 | Exterior

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The most substantial changes on the new Kwid are on the exterior, especially the front design of the car. The most noticeable change is the repositioning of the headlamp cluster placed low in the bumper with LED inserts and the DRLs sitting on top of them. This trend had been recently followed by cars of segments much above the Kwid and is a refreshing update for the mini-crossover. Additional changes include a revised bumper and chrome inserts on the grill.
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The side profile of the car is almost similar to the previous model. The only change being the wheels been upsized from 13-inches to 14-inches.
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All these exterior upgrades give the 2020 Kwid a butcher stance than the pre-facelift edition.
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Renault Kwid 2020 vs 2015 | Dimensions Comparison

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There have been slight changes to the dimensions of the new Kwid on paper.
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Version
2020 BS6 Renault Kwid
Pre-facelift 2015 Renault Kwid
Length
3731mm
3697mm
Height
1490 mm
1478 mm
Width
1579mm
1579mm
Ground clearance
184mm
180mm
Wheelbase
2422mm
2422mm
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Renault Kwid 2020 vs 2015 | Interior and Feature Upgrades

2020 Renault Kwid has got an interesting revamp on the inside. A redesigned dashboard layout, tech-enhancements, and various readjustments have been made.
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Changes to the dash include a new and sporty steering wheel, redesigned A\C vents, also the A\C controls have been shifted below the infotainment system. In the AMT variants, the drive-selector knob has also been shifted to between the two front passenger seats.
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Here the list of all the new features on the Renault Kwid 2020 :
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  • 8.0-inch touchscreen infotainment system with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto
  • New-age digital instrument cluster
  • Rear parking sensors
  • ABS (as standard)
  • Driver airbags( lower variants)
  • Dual airbags (top-spec RXT and climber variants)
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Renault Kwid

  • To make the car fit in the budget category, all sorts of plastic have been used. The wing mirrors are finished in plastic, to keep the weight low as well. A few more noticeable weight reduction measures are three lug nuts instead of four and super lightweight doors.
  • The Renault Kwid has a very bold look when looked for a hatchback.
  • For a compact vehicle, it has a roomy inside. It offers good legroom and headroom in the front and back lodge.
  • Another point is which makes a difference is the Kwid’s engine. The three-cylinder engine produces more power output when compared to its competitor Alto 800.
  • The Kwid offers a top tier 300-litre boot space, while its opposition, the Alto, has just 177-litres of room to convey gear.
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Article sourced from: https://bonjourrenault.wordpress.com/2020/11/18/renault-kwid-2020-vs-2015-renault-kwid-comparision/


Cars Renault will launch in South Africa in 2020

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Renault South Africa will be launching several new models later this year despite severe delays in production due to the coronavirus pandemic. The refreshed line-up of new cars for the local market includes an ultra-sporty Megane RS model as well as enhanced crossovers and SUVs.
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Over the past five years, Renault South Africa has increased its share of the local new car market thanks to the introduction of the popular Kwid. Its Sandero range has also helped the French brand grow at the entry-level end of the market. Speaking at the launch of the refreshed Kwid compact car in Johannesburg late last year, Renault South Africa's marketing and communications vice president Jesus Boveda confirmed that the company was fifth-largest in SA in terms of new vehicle sales, with aspirations to climb a few rungs higher on the ladder.
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These are the cars the brand will bring to SA to help its ascent...
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Looking to pick fights with the recently facelifted Honda Civic Type R (we're awaiting confirmation that it's still coming in 2020) and the recently introduced Volkswagen Golf GTI TCR, the new Renault Megane Trophy will add some excitement to the performance hatch market.
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Renault confirmed earlier this week that the 221kW hot hatch will feature breakthrough exhaust system technologies, bi-material brakes, a Torsen limited-slip differential and, most importantly, a firmer chassis for more precise control and handling.
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The previous generation Megane RS Trophy was simply astounding to drive, with an Akrapovic exhaust at the back and a trick intake system upfront giving it a roar like no other factory-tuned hot hatch at that time.
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The new Megane RS Trophy will also come with an F1-inspired splitter under its front bumper, a wide rear diffuser, bespoke hatch spoiler and custom central exhaust tips. 19-inch Jerez wheels with high-performance Bridgestone tyres also come standard.
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Three Family-focused options confirmed.
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Renault will be launching updated versions of its Koleos mid-size SUV and its Duster compact SUV during the third quarter of 2020. While mechanical treatment will be kept minimal, you can expect a smart styling update as well as tweaks to the interior. Exact specifications and the grade walk will be made available closer to the time of launch.
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For those consumers who want to keep the budget tight, but without compromising on style, comfort and safety, Renault SA will also bring an updated Sandero Stepway to market later this year. Bearing the TechRoad nomenclature we first saw on the Duster, the new Sandero Stepway will serve to keep compact hatchback buyers satisfied until the all-new fifth-generation Clio arrives.
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The best new models are still to come
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While news that the updated Megane RS, Koleos, Duster and Sandero Stepway coming to SA this year remains exciting for the company and consumers, considering the state of the world, the fifth-generation Clio and the all-new Captur might not make it to SA this year, but they are still on the horizon...
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Delays in production as well as pent up demand for these new vehicles in other parts of the world hint at a 2021 introduction for us, however if things change in the coming months, Renault SA will still look to bring the new compact hatch and the compact SUV to Group 1 Renault this year.
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"These are models that have a good track record and are quite revered in some instances. The above-mentioned models are refreshing the range, staying fresh, staying relevant and staying appealing to meet and exceed customers needs and expectations," the company's media relations manager, Viviene Ward, says.
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She adds that Renault SA will push to offer even better value for customers in the coming months: "Ongoing, extensive work goes into monitoring the competitive environment with the main aim to position ourselves to stand out in terms of value for money. One example of being sensitive to these challenging times is the offer we are running on the Kwid range that includes 1-year's worth of comprehensive car insurance, a 2-year Service Plan, and a 5-year mechanical warranty from only R1999pm.
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"Another is the Sandero range that now offers customers a payment break of up to six months and it still comes with a 2-year Service Plan and 5-year mechanical warranty."
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New Renault Kwid Models For 2020

The smallest model in the French firm’s local range, the Renault Kwid, has proven nothing short of a smash hit in South Africa, promptly assuming the role of the brand’s best-seller.
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And that popularity shows no signs of waning. Indeed, in the first ten months of 2019, as many as 8 709 examples of the little budget car were registered across the nation (taking the total since launch to a whopping 27 702 units), with the Kwid achieving a monthly sales figure in excess of 1 000 units as many as five times. That makes it the fourth best-selling passenger vehicle so far this year, behind only Volkswagen’s seemingly unconquerable Polo and Polo Vivo, and Toyota’s Fortuner. A considerable number of South African buyers, including those who manage rental fleets, clearly place value at the very top of their lists of priorities, then.

Of course, Renault South Africa has steadily expanded its Kwid line-up at Group 1 Renault over the past three years (adding special-edition models such as the Xtreme as well as the flagship Climber), while also introducing automated manual variants and (finally!) fitting ABS as standard as recently as April 2019. But this latest update represents the first formal facelift for the diminutive crossover-inspired hatchback.

The new range

The updated local Renault Kwid range has grown from five to six derivatives, with the familiar Expression, Dynamique and Climber trim levels each offered with either a five-speed manual gearbox or an automated manual transmission employing the same number of cogs. Pricing now runs from R144 800, while one year of comprehensive insurance, a two-year/30 000 km service plan and a five-year/150 000 km warranty are all included. That sees its well-positioned against rivals such as Hyundai’s box-fresh and smartly priced Atos, the Datsun Go (now offered in CVT guise, too), Suzuki’s underrated Celerio and the base models in Kia’s Picanto range.

So, what exactly does the Kwid’s mid-cycle refresh entail? Well, besides the obvious styling changes – the most noticeable being the thoroughly revised front end, which includes an in-vogue split-lighting arrangement comprising narrow daytime running items sited atop chunky main elements framing a new grille, along with new LED taillamps – Renault has also ostensibly improved the Indian-built Kwid’s safety specifications.

Talking safety

Dual airbags now ship standard (the pre-facelift model made do with a single driver’s item, remember), while the long-awaited ABS with EBD has, naturally, been retained. A seat-belt reminder for the front pews has also been introduced. Is that enough for the Kwid to better its most recent Global NCAP crash test rating, a solitary star scored back in 2016? Well, any improvement would likely be marginal, what with Renault South Africa disappointingly confirming no changes have been made to the vehicle’s structure (such an amendment would likely come only with the next-generation model, the company says).

The French firm’s local arm does, however, quite cryptically state the facelifted Kwid has gained a "new rear axle", while the already lofty ride height has seemingly been further hiked by four millimetres to 184 mm, likely thanks to the fitment of 14-inch wheels (an inch bigger than before and now wrapped in high-profile 165/70 Apollo Amazer XP rubber). Thanks to the mysterious tweaks made to the rear suspension (which remains torsion beam in construction) and the adoption of slightly chunkier wheel wells plus a larger spare wheel, the luggage compartment has shrunk to a claimed 279 litres. Interestingly, the vehicle’s overall length has been increased slightly to 3 731 mm, though the wheelbase is an unchanged 2 422 mm.

Step inside

Inside, the ergonomic shortcomings that afflicted the original model have been left largely unaddressed, still stemming from a decidedly perched seating position and a lack of height adjustment on the driver’s pew (the latter admittedly the norm in this segment). For taller drivers, this results in a distinct shortage of headroom and leaves the stowed sun visor partially obstructing the pilot’s forward view. Add a fixed steering column and those with lengthier limbs find themselves having to awkwardly adjust their bodies to the controls rather than the other way around.

Still, at least the Kwid offers plenty of kit at the price, with a new centrally sited 8,0-inch touchscreen – complete with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto functionality, and handily relaying video from a reversing camera – standard on Dynamique and Climber variants. These derivatives furthermore gain a second 12 V powerpoint (for use by rear passengers, interestingly sited at the edge of the parcel shelf), a fast-charging USB port up front, rear power windows and electrically adjustable side mirrors. A redesigned digital instrument cluster, revised steering wheel and rear parking sensors, meanwhile, are standard across the range. And while the vast majority of plastics employed throughout the cabin are justifiably hard, fit and finish remain decent for the segment.

Under the bonnet

The powertrain, though, is carried over unchanged, with the firm’s naturally aspirated 1,0-litre three-cylinder petrol engine still offering class-typical outputs of 50 kW and 91 N.m. We again found the little three-pot does its best work – though quite vociferously – high up the rev range (peak twisting force arrives at a fairly elevated 4 250 r/min, after all). It's interesting to note, though, that the firm's spec sheet suggests the updated model has gained around 40 kg, which means the little engine has a bit more to lug around.

Though Renault claims a vast improvement in road holding thanks to the apparent fine-tuning of the rear axle and the adoption of larger wheels, it proved difficult to detect any discernible change on the short drive in Gauteng without having an outgoing model on hand to compare. In short, though, the high centre of gravity and softly sprung suspension (perhaps ideal at low speeds on poorly surfaced roads in the vehicle’s domestic market of India) again combine to deliver what is an at-times unsettled experience at higher velocities.

Final thoughts

While we applaud the inclusion of ABS and dual airbags here (but had hoped for some additional structural reinforcements, too, as have been applied to the Brazilian-market model), some of our misgivings from that January 2017 road test – in which the original Kwid scored a lowly 54 out of 100 – remain. But so does the South African buying public’s enthusiasm for the nameplate. Add fresh looks, extra equipment and yet more value to the package, and the Kwid’s local sales success story looks set to continue, safety concerns or not.
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Article source: https://www.carmag.co.za/new-cars/Renault/Kwid

Renault’s 2018 Sandero Stepway Plus Is Smart

Renault’s Sandero range has been wowing the sales charts in recent months. The addition of smartphone mirroring to the Stepway Plus top-of-the-range model gave us the chance to revisit this somewhat under-rated entry-level car.
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The arrival of a Renault Sandero Stepway Plus was the cause of some surprise to us recently, as initially, it appeared that no fundamental changes had been made to the model since its launch. After reviewing the Sandero Plus towards the latter part of 2018 with a slant towards its utility as a family car.
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However, in May this year, Renault added smartphone mirroring with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto compatibility to its already impressive MediaNav system.
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At the same time, we again noted the presence of the rear parking camera, always a boon on a car with a high rear tail section like the Sandero. So here was a chance to re-appraise the Sandero, which has never enjoyed much glamour status, but regularly notches up sales of above 500 a month for Renault.
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Styling

Possibly one of the most telling changes to the Sandero Stepway Plus in May 2018 was to raise the ground clearance when the range was refreshed in mid-2018. The standard Sandero Expression has a ground clearance of 164 mm and this rises to 193 mm with the Stepway Plus model. Wheel size on the Stepway Plus model also increases from 15 inches to 16 inches and these two changes at once give far more credence to the Sandero’s image as a Cross Over model, rather than an entry-level hatch.
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In addition, the Stepway Plus is adorned with roof rails, skid plates beneath the grille area, fog lamps, attractive alloy wheels (instead of the smaller steel wheels on the base model) and more rugged wheel arch mouldings.
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All this has been quite subtly done so there is no feeling of the car having been given a quick add-on fix. In essence, the Sandero styling is pretty unremarkable, but these changes have made it quite presentable.
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Inside, the interior has a surprising feel of quality. The steering wheel is leather-covered on the Stepway Plus and features a chunky, small-diameter design that is pleasing to look at and also to operate. The plastics used on the dash and door panels are pretty much of the hard variety, so not too much in the way of soft-touch surfaces. But the Renault MediaNav system is neatly integrated into the dash just below two large air vents, while the rest of the controls offer simple-to-operate functionality, especially the large rotary switches for ventilation and air-con. It is always a pleasure to hop into a car and immediately suss how to operate the flow of air into the car, rather than having to scroll through a menu!
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The Drive
All Sandero models use Renault’s mainstay entry-level engine, the 66 kW three-cylinder turbocharged petrol unit displacing just under 900 cc. This engine is also used in the Clio, although it is rated at a slightly more- punchy 70 kW.
The engine works well in the Sandero thanks to 135 Nm of torque being on tap from2 500 rpm and up. Also, you immediately noticed that the car is reasonably light with an unladen weight of 1 046 kg.
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The power delivery is quite smooth for a three-cylinder, and the ratios on the five-speed gearbox are well-matched to the torque delivery. So, unless you are in a tearing hurry, there is a sense of responsiveness that is easy to live with.
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Ride quality:
Allied to this, the ride quality is surprisingly good. The chassis seems much more solid than you would expect by looking at the Sandero, and the raised suspension deals with heavy bumps, potholes and speed-bumps well. Importantly, there is good connectivity between the steering wheel and the road wheels, and this Renault tracks straight and true with a minimum of fuss at highway speeds.
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Performance
That maximum output of 66 kW doesn’t sound like much on paper, and nor does 135 Nm of torque. But when you press on, the Sandero Stepway Plus enables a respectable 0-100 km/h time of 11,1 seconds. Top speed is perhaps less impressive at 169 km/h, but that is pretty much academic for a car of this configuration. The key to all this useable performance is, again, the low weight of the car.
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Another factor we enjoyed about the Sandero is that it is fitted with a five-speed gearbox and not a six-speed. For this type of no-nonsense people-mover, five-speeds are more than adequate when the engine’s power-band is matched to ratios that are neither too short nor too tall. Often when manufacturers fit a six-speed manual ‘box to a car they opt for impossibly tall ratios to drop the revs in sixth gear and thus improve (theoretical) fuel consumption figures. The Sandero can operate in fifth gear on the highway quite comfortably.
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Fuel Consumption
Far more important than flat-out acceleration figures for a small family run-around like the Sandero is fuel consumption. A look at the datasheets reveals that fuel consumption is rated at an average of 5,2 litres/100 km. Like all manufacturers’ figures that are all but impossible to achieve in day-to-day motoring, as these tests are conducted in very theoretical, simulated conditions. But we nevertheless averaged 6,4 litres/100 km, which is quite impressive for a full five-seater hatch.
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Again, we credit the low overall weight of the car at just over 1 000 kg with the impressiveness of these figures. They aren’t best-in-class, but the nice thing about the Sandero is you can achieve these low consumption figures by just driving the car normally because the gear ratios are so well-matched to the spread of power delivery.
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Space and Comfort
As far as the interior space is concerned , the raised ride height on the Sandero Stepway Plus enables easy entry and departure from the cabin for the driver and front passenger. The rear is a little tight on legroom, although headroom is good all round. The boot is quite respectably sized rated at 292 litres. Happily- a full-sized spare wheel is fitted.
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Safety
The Sandero Stepway range achieved a moderate three-star NCAP safety rating with four stars for child safety. But in Stepway Plus form it comes with four airbags.
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More importantly, perhaps, the Stepway Plus comes with an impressive array of electronic safety devices. Apart from ABS brakes it has Emergency Brake Assist which applies maximum baking efficiency automatically in emergency situations. It also has Electronic Stability Control, where the wheels are automatically braked individually to assist in arresting either front-wheel or rear-wheel skids, and traction control. Hill Start Assist is also fitted, which is always handy for pulling away easily on an uphill and not getting shunted up the rear because you have inadvertently stalled.
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Verdict
Overall, the Renault Sandero Stepway is a nice surprise. It has a modest image that has been nicely enhanced with styling and safety add-ons. But more than anything else, it is the overall feeling of good build quality that impresses, along with Renault’s innovation in equipping even its most basic models with up-to-the-minute infotainment systems that include Navigation, and now, in the case of the Stepway Plus, with smartphone mirroring.
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The pricing of the Sandero range starts at R184 900 for the Expression. This top-of-the-range model, the Sandero Plus, is still very well-priced at R219 900, and that price includes a good warranty of 5 years/150 000 km. as well as a 2-year/30 000 km service plan.
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It’s a very good buy for a young family, and we are not surprised that it is selling so well. Check out the Renault Sandero price and specs on Group 1 Renault’s digital showroom.
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Article from:
Renault’s Sandero range has been wowing the sales charts in recent months. The addition of smartphone mirroring to the Stepway Plus top-of-the-range model gave us the chance to revisit this somewhat under-rated entry-level car.
The arrival of a Renault Sandero Stepway Plus was the cause of some surprise to us recently, as initially, it appeared that no fundamental changes had been made to the model since its launch. After reviewing the Sandero Plus towards the latter part of 2018 with a slant towards its utility as a family car.
However, in May this year, Renault added smartphone mirroring with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto compatibility to its already impressive MediaNav system.
At the same time, we again noted the presence of the rear parking camera, always a boon on a car with a high rear tail section like the Sandero. So here was a chance to re-appraise the Sandero, which has never enjoyed much glamour status, but regularly notches up sales of above 500 a month for Renault.

Styling

Possibly one of the most telling changes to the Sandero Stepway Plus in May 2018 was to raise the ground clearance when the range was refreshed in mid-2018. The standard Sandero Expression has a ground clearance of 164 mm and this rises to 193 mm with the Stepway Plus model. Wheel size on the Stepway Plus model also increases from 15 inches to 16 inches and these two changes at once give far more credence to the Sandero’s image as a Cross Over model, rather than an entry-level hatch.
In addition, the Stepway Plus is adorned with roof rails, skid plates beneath the grille area, fog lamps, attractive alloy wheels (instead of the smaller steel wheels on the base model) and more rugged wheel arch mouldings.
All this has been quite subtly done so there is no feeling of the car having been given a quick add-on fix. In essence, the Sandero styling is pretty unremarkable, but these changes have made it quite presentable.
Inside, the interior has a surprising feel of quality. The steering wheel is leather-covered on the Stepway Plus and features a chunky, small-diameter design that is pleasing to look at and also to operate. The plastics used on the dash and door panels are pretty much of the hard variety, so not too much in the way of soft-touch surfaces. But the Renault MediaNav system is neatly integrated into the dash just below two large air vents, while the rest of the controls offer simple-to-operate functionality, especially the large rotary switches for ventilation and air-con. It is always a pleasure to hop into a car and immediately suss how to operate the flow of air into the car, rather than having to scroll through a menu!
The Drive
All Sandero models use Renault’s mainstay entry-level engine, the 66 kW three-cylinder turbocharged petrol unit displacing just under 900 cc. This engine is also used in the Clio, although it is rated at a slightly more- punchy 70 kW.
The engine works well in the Sandero thanks to 135 Nm of torque being on tap from2 500 rpm and up. Also, you immediately noticed that the car is reasonably light with an unladen weight of 1 046 kg.
The power delivery is quite smooth for a three-cylinder, and the ratios on the five-speed gearbox are well-matched to the torque delivery. So, unless you are in a tearing hurry, there is a sense of responsiveness that is easy to live with.
Ride quality:
Allied to this, the ride quality is surprisingly good. The chassis seems much more solid than you would expect by looking at the Sandero, and the raised suspension deals with heavy bumps, potholes and speed-bumps well. Importantly, there is good connectivity between the steering wheel and the road wheels, and this Renault tracks straight and true with a minimum of fuss at highway speeds.
Performance
That maximum output of 66 kW doesn’t sound like much on paper, and nor does 135 Nm of torque. But when you press on, the Sandero Stepway Plus enables a respectable 0-100 km/h time of 11,1 seconds. Top speed is perhaps less impressive at 169 km/h, but that is pretty much academic for a car of this configuration. The key to all this useable performance is, again, the low weight of the car.
Another factor we enjoyed about the Sandero is that it is fitted with a five-speed gearbox and not a six-speed. For this type of no-nonsense people-mover, five-speeds are more than adequate when the engine’s power-band is matched to ratios that are neither too short nor too tall. Often when manufacturers fit a six-speed manual ‘box to a car they opt for impossibly tall ratios to drop the revs in sixth gear and thus improve (theoretical) fuel consumption figures. The Sandero can operate in fifth gear on the highway quite comfortably.
Fuel Consumption
Far more important than flat-out acceleration figures for a small family run-around like the Sandero is fuel consumption. A look at the datasheets reveals that fuel consumption is rated at an average of 5,2 litres/100 km. Like all manufacturers’ figures that are all but impossible to achieve in day-to-day motoring, as these tests are conducted in very theoretical, simulated conditions. But we nevertheless averaged 6,4 litres/100 km, which is quite impressive for a full five-seater hatch.
Again, we credit the low overall weight of the car at just over 1 000 kg with the impressiveness of these figures. They aren’t best-in-class, but the nice thing about the Sandero is you can achieve these low consumption figures by just driving the car normally because the gear ratios are so well-matched to the spread of power delivery.
Space and Comfort
As far as the interior space is concerned , the raised ride height on the Sandero Stepway Plus enables easy entry and departure from the cabin for the driver and front passenger. The rear is a little tight on legroom, although headroom is good all round. The boot is quite respectably sized rated at 292 litres. Happily- a full-sized spare wheel is fitted.
Safety
The Sandero Stepway range achieved a moderate three-star NCAP safety rating with four stars for child safety. But in Stepway Plus form it comes with four airbags.
More importantly, perhaps, the Stepway Plus comes with an impressive array of electronic safety devices. Apart from ABS brakes it has Emergency Brake Assist which applies maximum baking efficiency automatically in emergency situations. It also has Electronic Stability Control, where the wheels are automatically braked individually to assist in arresting either front-wheel or rear-wheel skids, and traction control. Hill Start Assist is also fitted, which is always handy for pulling away easily on an uphill and not getting shunted up the rear because you have inadvertently stalled.
Verdict
Overall, the Renault Sandero Stepway is a nice surprise. It has a modest image that has been nicely enhanced with styling and safety add-ons. But more than anything else, it is the overall feeling of good build quality that impresses, along with Renault’s innovation in equipping even its most basic models with up-to-the-minute infotainment systems that include Navigation, and now, in the case of the Stepway Plus, with smartphone mirroring.
The pricing of the Sandero range starts at R184 900 for the Expression. This top-of-the-range model, the Sandero Plus, is still very well-priced at R219 900, and that price includes a good warranty of 5 years/150 000 km. as well as a 2-year/30 000 km service plan.
It’s a very good buy for a young family, and we are not surprised that it is selling so well. Check out the Renault Sandero price and specs on Group 1 Renault’s digital showroom.
Article from: https://bonjourrenault.wordpress.com/2020/08/04/renaults-2018-sandero-stepway-plus-is-smart/

A little About The Used Renault Sandero

A full used buyer’s guide on the Renault Sandero for sale.

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Due to its bargain price at Group 1 Renault, it would be easy to dismiss the used Renault Sandero as an also-ran that could never rival the likes of the Peugeot 208, Kia Rio or even the DS 3. But the reality is that as an overall ownership proposition, it trounces these cars as they rank well below the Renault in this year’s Driver Power survey. There’s no denying the value the used Renault provides. So if you’re looking for cheap motoring but don’t want to compromise reliability, comfort or practicality, we’d recommend you get better acquainted with the Sandero.
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Buyers love their premium models, so the idea of launching a budget car brand might have seemed crazy to many people when Renault arrived in 2013.
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This Renault subsidiary started out as Romania’s national car maker 50 years ago, but was absorbed into the French giant’s portfolio in 1999. And it swiftly made waves by launching the UK’s cheapest car, in the shape of the sub-R120,000 Sandero.
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But while this supermini follows Renault’s template of providing reliable, practical transport on a budget instead of focusing on cutting-edge tech or design flair, there’s more to it than just a low price. The brand offers a range of engines, well equipped higher-spec models and a rugged-looking, crossover-style Stepway model. And owners tell us they love their Sanderos.
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History

The first Renault Sanderos hit UK dealers in January 2013. Buyers could choose from 73bhp 1.2 or 90bhp turbocharged 0.9-litre petrol engines, plus a 90bhp 1.5 diesel. At launch there were Access, Ambiance and Laureate trim levels, as well as the chunky Stepway, but in March 2015 a Laureate Prime was added. This new range-topping car had Cosmos Blue metallic paint, electric rear windows, upgraded interior trim and a seven-inch multimedia touchscreen.
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Euro 6 engines were fitted from August 2015, cutting CO2 emissions and boosting fuel economy. In April 2016 an Ambiance Prime special edition was launched, with alloys, metallic paint and front foglights.
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Entry-level Access models feature steel wheels, black bumpers and manual windows. They don’t even have a radio, although they do get power-steering, ESP, tyre pressure monitors and a split rear seat. Move up to the Ambiance and there are body-coloured bumpers, more upmarket interior trim, remote central locking, electric front windows, Bluetooth and a radio.
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The flagship Laureate has alloys, posher cabin trim, a trip computer, cruise control, air-con, heated and electrically adjustable door mirrors, plus height-adjustable front seats and seatbelts. The Stepway only comes in Ambiance and Laureate trims.
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