Steering Wheel Wonderings

Steering Wheel Wonderings

Reviewing The Used Renault Clio

The fourth-generation Renault Clio is a compact five-door hatchback built on the same platform as the smaller Renault Zoe. It was replaced by the current fifth-generation Clio in 2019.
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Rivalling other mainstream superminis like the Ford Fiesta, Vauxhall Corsa and Volkswagen Polo, the fourth-generation Renault Clio for sale was available as a petrol, diesel or hybrid model (abroad), with both manual and automatic gearboxes available.
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This iteration of the Clio has a more spacious cabin than its predecessor thanks to its longer wheelbase. The hatchback was given a mild mid-life facelift in the middle of 2016, consisting of exterior styling tweaks, new interior trim details and functions, infotainment updates and the addition of LED headlights.
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There is a performance-tuned version called the Renault Clio R.S., but we will be making a separate page for that model, coming soon. The Renault Clio was also sold as an estate elsewhere in Europe, but this version was not sold in the UK.
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Throughout its lifespan, the fourth-generation Clio received average to very good reviews scores from the British media – affordable, well-equipped and comfortable, Parkers concluded that the Clio didn’t have "any particular weaknesses" when it was on sale. However, now off sale, many reviewers comment that the Clio’s interior is now looking dated.
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Carwow explains that "newer models have simpler designs, bigger screens and better infotainment systems", while Carbuyer says that the Clio’s cheap interior plastics mean that the car’s interior build quality is somewhat inferior to the likes of the Volkswagen Polo.
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What Car? adds that the Skoda Fabia has more interior space than the Clio, and that the Ford Fiesta offers the best performance and handling in the Supermini class. That said, most reviewers agree that the Clio is a stylish hatchback and a good value-for-money package – a great all-rounder that proved to be a capable alternative to the supermini class leaders during its tenure.
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Now no longer on sale as a new car, the fourth-generation Renault Clio holds an Expert Rating of 63% (based on 42 reviews published by UK media sources).
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What Is A Used Renault Megane Hatchback Like?


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The Renault Megane for sale has been around since 1995 when it replaced the Renault 19 and went on to spawn several different body styles, including the taller Scenic, longer Estate, sportier Coupe and, er, breezier Cabriolet.

In this used car review of the Renault Megane - the focus will be on the five-door hatchback version of the third-generation Megane, which was first launched in 2008.

As with previous Meganes, this version obtained a full five-star rating in Euro NCAP’s industry standard crash tests at launch, although this was subsequently reduced to four stars when retested in 2014 under tougher conditions.

Renault also took the unusual step of prioritising a big boot over space for rear-seat passengers, so there’s appreciably more room for luggage or baby buggies than you get in a Ford Focus or a Volkswagen Golf of the same vintage. However, if you want to carry a tall rear passenger or perhaps a rear-facing child seat on an Isofix base in the back seats you wouldn’t want the person in the front to be too tall, and even then, headroom is a little tight.

Interior quality is a mixed bag, with the main dashboard feeling quite plush while some of the other panels and control are a little flimsy. Renault’s music system is also fiddly to use, and programming the optional TomTom sourced sat-nav can be tricky because its controls are located by the handbrake.

As for the driving experience, the Megane does a solid enough job of being composed and comfortable without ever threatening to offer much in the way of fun. The range of petrol engines earlier in the Megane’s life included a 1.6-litre with 73 kW or 80.5 kW, a 1.4-litre turbo with 95 kW, or a 2.0-litre turbo with 132.7 kW. A smooth and punchy 85.7 kW1.2-litre TCe turbo was added to the range in 2012.

On the diesel front, buyers of early cars can choose between 1.5- and 1.9-litre engines with power outputs ranging from 62.6 kW to 95 kW. These were later joined by a 1.5-litre dCi with 80.5 kW or the 1.6-litre dCi with 95 kW.

In 2014, the Megane received a more modern grille design in line with Renault’s other cars. Shortly after this GT models were re-launched with more powerful 2.0-litre petrol and diesel engines, uprated suspension and sportier looks..
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Choosing The Best Value For Your Money Used Renault Clio

Getting the best value for your money – buying a used Renault Clio

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The AutoTrader team put together this great article that compares used Renault Clio models. We hope this helps you decide which older-generation Clio suits your budget used car needs best.
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This article compares the various Renault Clio 4 models available on the used market to see which trim level offers the best value for money.
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The fourth-generation Renault Clio has been in circulation since 2013 and presents what seems like good value for money on the pre-owned market. The Clio 4 is due for replacement in the near future, but that doesn't mean that you have to splash out on a new one in order to get a good buy.
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The entire Clio range was awarded a then 5-star Euro NCAP award for safety and all models are fitted with ABS, Emergency Brake Assist (EBA), ESP, Hill Start, Cruise Control, Driver, Passenger and side airbags, electric front windows, Bluetooth connectivity, USB and Aux input as well as LED Daytime Running lights.
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Take a look at the various models that were offered in the Clio 4 range and see which models offer the best current value for money. It's important to note that some models listed here were limited edition models or models that were dropped from the lineup during the life cycle.
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Renault Clio 55kW Authentique

The 55kW Authentique is powered by a 55kW (74hp) 1.2-litre 4-cylinder petrol engine that returns fuel consumption figures of a claimed 5.5l/100km. It was only sold for a short while before being discontinued in favour of the 66kW engine unit.
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Renault Clio 66kW Turbo Authentique

When the 55kW engine was dropped in favour of the 0.9-litre turbocharged 66kW (88hp) engine, returning a claimed 4.5l/100km. The Authentique model received some small upgrades including the Renault R&GO audio system with a smartphone cradle.
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Renault Clio 66kW Turbo Expression

Expression models employ the same engine and drivetrain as the Authentique models with a claimed fuel consumption figure of 4.5l/100km. These models see the addition of the Renault Media Nav system with integrated satellite navigation, a leather-bound steering wheel, standard air conditioning, and 16-inch alloy wheels.
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Renault Clio 66kW Turbo Blaze

The limited-run Blaze version uses the same 0.9-litre engine but includes an overboost function that bumps power to 70kW and 150Nm torque (up from 135Nm) momentarily. It has the same trim level as the Expression model with the exception of the 15-inch steel wheels with trim covers.
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Renault Clio 66kW Turbo Dynamique

On the higher end of the spectrum, the Dynamique model variants include all of the aforementioned technology and convenience but adds in the Pure Vision LED headlights and LED taillight elements (from 2016), Auto lights, Auto wipers, electric rear windows, 17-inch alloy wheels and gloss black and chrome trimmings.
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Renault Clio 88kW Turbo GT-Line

As one would expect from a model carrying the GT logo, the Clio GT-Line adds some more power into the mix. The 1.2-litre, 4-cylinder turbocharged engine in the GT-Line yields 88kW and 205Nm while returning consumption figures of 5.3l/100km.
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17-inch alloys wheels, redesigned front and rear bumpers, R.S. Steering and an R.S. gear knob along with GT trimmings sets the GT-Line apart from the rest. The GT-Line is also fitted with sport seats.
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Renault Clio 88kW Turbo Expression EDC (Auto)

The Clio Expression EDC is a sweet spot in the range and combines the best of both worlds. It's fitted with the more powerful 1.2-litre engine as found in the GT-Line but has the same, easy-going trimmings of the Expression model, doing away with the raciness that one finds in the GT-Line. Its crowning glory is the dual-clutch automatic gearbox that helps the Clio return fuel consumption figures of 5.2l/100km.
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Renault Clio R.S. Lux

Performance enthusiasts will gravitate towards the R.S. models . These models are fitted with high-performance 1.6-litre turbocharged, 4-cylinder engines. In the Lux model, this engine produces 147kW (200hp) and is coupled to a 6-speed EDC automatic gearbox, sending power to a set of 17-inch wheels through an R.S. differential.
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The R.S. models have R.S. specific bodywork including a front and rear bumper, side skirts and a rear diffuser with twin-exit exhaust pipes. The interior is awash with R.S. items including sport seats, steering wheel, gear knob, pedals the R.S. Monitor system.
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Renault Clio R.S. Trophy

The R.S. Trophy steps things up a notch from the Lux model by featuring a Trophy chassis that is more tightly sprung, 18-inch alloy wheels, heated seats, and an Akrapovic exhaust system. These models produce 162kW (220hp) and still manage to return fuel consumption figures of 5.9l/100km.
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Renault Clio R.S.18 F1

The last hurrah of the fourth generation Clio is the R.S.18 F1 . Built to honour the Renault Formula 1 team, the R.S.18 F1 is a limited edition offering based on the R.S. Trophy and powered by the same 162kW, 1.6-litre turbocharged engine.
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The R.S.18 F1 is distinguishable by its black paint with yellow detailing, blacked out badges and specific plaques and emblems. It also features launch control for improved sprints from 0 to 100km/h.
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The Experts’ Pick:

If performance is your bag, then the Lux version of the Clio R.S. is a good place to look. The high spec level combined with the auto gearbox makes it easy to live with while offering exciting driving at the same time.
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Should you not wish to go for the R.S. version, the 66kW Dynamique model offers a fabulous blend of comfort, convenience and fuel-efficient motoring, all at a price that won't cripple the bank.
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Source: https://www.autotrader.co.za/cars/

What’s Coming In 2022 From Renault South Africa As Told By MD

Renault South Africa's managing director, Jaco Oosthuizen, spoke to the Wheels24 team about all things Renault SA, the automotive industry in today’s times and what consumers can look forward to in 2022.
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Here is a Wheels24 exclusive interview with Renault South Africa managing director Jaco Oosthuizen.
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1. Would you mind sharing insights on Renault's recent business operations from a global and local perspective and how 2021 has treated the local market in terms of new car sales?
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"2021 saw the implementation of the global repositioning of the Renault brand with the launch of the 'Renaulution' introduced by the Renault Groupe Global CEO Luca de Meo late in 2020, centred on building brand value over time and driving the company to be a technology-forward organisation.
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"Our new corporate identity and the brand shift has brought a fresh look and feel to the Renault brand, in a bid to create a more iconic brand. 2021 presented several challenges further to the pandemic, such as the semiconductor shortages and supply chain challenges. Despite the issues faced, we forecast the overall local passenger and light commercial vehicle market to end between 435 000 to 445 000 units this year. A strong recovery from 2020, exceeding most initial forecasts.
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"At Renault SA, we are targeting a market share of 5 per cent up 0.4 per cent from 2020 but still 0.3 per cent down from 2019, our best year ever. The launch of the all-new Renault Kiger in September has served to reinvigorate sales, enabling record sales months over both September and October. We were limited to retailing five models only for the first eight months of 2021, with one in the run-out phase. The biggest challenge for us was to ensure dealer viability and to keep customers loyal to the brand. Our marketing and sales teams did a great job, and we managed to sell 1400 units per month up until August."
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2. You've introduced some exciting new models during the lockdown, such as the Kiger; however, many of your new models were delayed. Can you tell us why?
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"Renault SA should have launched both the new Clio and Captur models towards the end of 2020. Initially, the delay was due to a pricing issue because of the unfavourable exchange rate, followed by the global semiconductor shortages.
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"But I am happy to announce that we will launch the new Clio V in February 2022, followed shortly by Captur in May 2022. New Trafic models will join the local line-up later on in 2022, and there are some model enhancements in the planning phase for both the Kwid and Triber models."
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3. Renault has been teasing South Africans with the idea of a pick-up (bakkie) for some years. Is this going to happen in 2022?
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"Accurate prediction of the arrival of Oroch has proved challenging. Since joining the brand in 2017, our forecast has always been "next year", but in all honestly, Oroch is manufactured as a left-hand drive vehicle in Brazil and will have to be converted to a right-hand drive vehicle and homologated for the SA market."
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4. As RS Performance cars are now part of Renault's Alpine division, is it true that we won't be able to buy the next-generation Clio RS?
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"The Clio RS F1 limited edition that we launched in 2019 was the last of the Clio RS models. Fortunately for our RS customers, there are plans in play to source Megane RS within our market. Timing for this yet to be confirmed."
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5. Megane has moved into the all-electric space, and Renault is no newcomer in this electric car race. Can we expect a more significant push into hybrids and EVs with the new Megane in 2022?
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"Yes, but not yet in 2022. As you know, Renault has been number one in Europe for electric vehicle (EV) sales throughout 2021. Globally, the brand has a strong EV line-up, ready for import if we can achieve the correct value proposition for both our clients and dealer network."
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6. What are some of the critical areas you plan to address in the Renault SA businessin the coming year?
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"We have developed an established and strong dealer network, with continued expansion planned to increase our footprint, coupled with a strong focus on customer retention and growth.
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"We will continue to focus on nurturing our relationships with our current corporate fleet clients to retain the existing contracts that we hold and ensure that these are extended into new replacement cycles.
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"Furthermore, we will be focusing on expanding our business with the government. We have worked hard on improving our after-sales proposition to our clients over the last five years, and this will remain a strong business priority as we advance. The success of our ongoing efforts is evident in the "Inaugural AA Spare Parts Pricing Guide" released in September and the last Kinsey report. 'Fixing cars the first time' when things go wrong is a critical strategic drive. We still have our brand challenges but have made great strides in countering these."
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7. Finally, what's been your greatest challenge and opportunity as the managing director at Renault SA in 2021 and what have you learned from this experience to make you a more robust business responder?
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"As I'm sure is the case with all managing directors, managing a brand through the three Covid-19 waves to date has been the most formidable challenge of my entire career, especially with the onset of the 1st wave, with no previous experience or understanding on how to manage an ongoing business within pandemic times.
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"Maintaining positive staff morale has remained my top priority, and as much as we have strived to keep all staff healthy and safe, we, unfortunately, lost two Renault DealerNetwork staff to Covid-19, with 12 staff in total have lost their lives to Covid-19 within our independent and multi-franchise network. It's been a challenging time, and we learn new things every day. I'm looking forward to 2022 and the challenges and opportunities it brings."
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Blog source: https://joiedevivrevehicles.tumblr.com/post/677889299808731136/whats-coming-in-2022-from-renault-south-africa-as

Renault’s Duster SUV Offers Charm And Value

Practical, capable and oozing with a no-nonsense appeal, the Renault Duster 4x4 is a great option in the over-populated and over-specced SUV market.
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Old-school charm
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The charm of this SUV lies in its no-nonsense appeal and off-road capability. And while its original boxy shape was criticised when it debuted, there have been impressive developments in both exterior and interior design since 2013.
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The all-new Renault Duster comes with a choice between petrol and diesel and three engine options – the 1.6L 16V and two versions of the 1.5 dCi turbo engine – available in 4×2 and 4×4.
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I recently got to test drive the latest 4×4 1.5-litre turbocharged diesel manual Duster SUV (there’s no auto in the 4×4), producing 80kW of power and 260Nm of torque. (The 4×2 derivative sits at 66kW and 210 Nm.)
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There’s nothing overly fancy or confusing when it comes to the Duster’s drive and tech. In many ways, it reminds me of an old Landie or Pajero, which do what they do without any pretensions. There aren’t 150 gazillion options to confuse you when it comes to setting up your drive. The seats aren’t heated and there are no shiatsu lumbar massage options. There’s no gesture control or call-on-demand courier services. It doesn’t take you 25 minutes to set up a phone from layers of different touch screens. However, that’s not to say this SUV doesn’t have what you need. There’s SatNav, phone mirroring and it’s Apple CarPlay and Android Auto compatible.
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Driving the Duster is a straightforward affair. You get in. You adjust your seat, check your mirrors, pair your phone, pull on your safety belt and drive. And with the Renault Duster price ranging between R327,900 and R374,800, it’s one of the best value propositions around.
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The drive
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The engine is responsive and torquey and on highways and open roads pretty good on the overtake once you get into the swing of gear changes. I did a few hours of not too hectic off-roading and got to play with the hill descent control function, which kicks in when you take your foot off the brake so that the vehicle can descend a steep decline in a slow and controlled fashion. Along with the usual safety and driver tech like EBD, ABS and blind-spot monitoring, there are a few handy new off-road features, like a 4×4 monitor and a multi-view camera that allows you to keep track of challenging terrain.
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Via a drive-mode selector, one can choose between front-wheel drive, four-wheel drive and off-road drive modes. It’s 210mm of ground clearance is class-leading and useful when scaling city kerbs. The approach angle of 30 degrees and departure angle of 34 degrees gear the Duster up for some tough all-terrain driving. Boot space is plentiful and with rear seats folded down, there’s a whopping 1,623 litres available. Fuel efficiency is seriously good at a claimed 4.8 l/100km – I got about 5.8.
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The Duster, with its practical hard plastics and not overly premium surfaces and finishes, is not trying to be some plush diva. Rather, it’s an SUV that can be driven and used: dogs, kids, gardening equipment… and no one’s going to have a cadenza if there are a few scratches and scuffs left behind.
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So, you’re probably not going to turn heads when you park, you aren’t going to get massaged in your heated seats or be the first out of the stalls when traffic lights change, but if reliability, capability and good value for money are what you’re after, the Duster is a seriously impressive proposition.
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Pricing:
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New Duster 1.5 dCi Dynamique 4×4 R361,900
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Standard five-year/150,000km mechanical warranty and six-year anti-corrosion warranty. Services at 15,000km intervals, with a standard three-year/45,000km service plan.
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Article from https://devotedtorenaultautomobiles.weebly.com/blog/renaults-duster-suv-offers-charm-and-value

Renault Sandero Stepway Takes On The Urban Jungle


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A small, affordable, economical and tough yet comfortable compact urban crossover, the Renault Sandero is an ideal and uncomplicated daily driver engineered with developing markets in mind. A rebadged version of Renault’s Romanian subsidiary Dacia’s high riding Sandero Stepway and its base hatchback sister, the Renault version is virtually indistinguishable bar the French manufacturer’s iconic diamond-like badge.
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Introduced in its first generation in 2008, the Stepway is already in its third generation for some markets, but for others, like SA, the second-generation Sandero model is still going strong.
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Wide stance compact

A junior sister model to Renault’s and Dacia’s popular Duster crossover, with a more distinctly urban appeal and less emphasis on off-road ability, the second generation Stepway was first launched at the 2012 Paris Motor Show. A smaller proposition than the Duster, the Stepway is noticeably shorter and more condensed in design. Compact and road-oriented as it may be, the Stepway nevertheless has a rugged SUV-like appeal owing to the black cladding along its lower wheel-arches and sills, faux front skid plate and roof rails.
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With similar width and height, and short wheelbase and rear overhang, the Stepway looks as agile and manoeuvrable as it is on the road, and seems to sit on the road with a greater sense of width than its demure dimensions suggest. With its lower cladding, subtly pronounced wheel-arches, broad bonnet and browed grille and headlights, the Stepway’s sense of width is further accentuated, despite compact actual proportions. Meanwhile, the Stepway features discretely bulging rear haunches and an arcing roofline tapering to a concise rear treatment.
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A step-up successor

A compact and comparative lightweight at an estimated 1,055kg, the Stepway develops 66 kW at 5,250rpm and 135 Nm at 2,500rpm, which allows decent estimated headline performance figures including 11-seconds 0-100km/h acceleration and approximately 170km/h top speed. Confident and responsive to throttle input from a standstill, the Stepway is progressive through revs and in power and torque delivery.
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Playful yet predictable

The Sandero’s "slingshot" style of operation as a speed build-up while ratios seamlessly alter and revs are held in a high torque range lends the Stepway what seems like a more versatile and confident mid-range for overtaking and incline. Driving the front wheels, the Stepway meanwhile feels more predictable and eager through corners than with the added weight of a front-biased all-wheel-drive system.
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Smooth and stable on road for its compact crossover class, the Stepway drives much like a keen and light front-drive hatchback through corners, despite sitting higher off the ground than the regular Dacia Sandero hatchback it is based on. Turning tidily into and leaning slightly through corners, the Stepway’s wide track lends good stability. Meanwhile, the lack of sudden power diversion to the rear makes the Stepway predictable and consistent in road-holding, and with its lightweight and small wheelbase, it is agile and adjustable through corners.
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Well-packaged and practical

Refined for its segment, the Stepway is comfortable and settled over most imperfections, with its modest 16" FLEX wheels providing good absorption, durability and help with steering feel. A decidedly urban-oriented crossover, the Stepway should be capable of better than expected but moderate off-road ability, if past experience with other front-drive Renault-Dacia vehicles is to go by. With front-drive, short wheelbase and overhangs, low weight and usefully high 173mm ground clearance the Stepway would be expected to make short work of many dry, unpaved dirt roads.
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Tall, compact and with a relatively big glasshouse, the Stepway is well-packaged with good visibility and is pleasant but unpretentious inside, with large uncomplicated controls, buttons and instrumentation, and seems well put together. The driving position is good and accommodates taller drivers, while rear space is decent for its class. Well equipped with useful mod cons, safety and infotainment features, if not advanced high tech equipment, the Stepway meanwhile provides easy boot access and 320-litre volume, which expands to 1,200-litres with its 60/40 split rear seats folded down.
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TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS

Engine: 3-cylinder turbo

Gearbox: 5-speed manual, front-wheel-drive

Power: 66 kW @5,250rpm

Torque: 135 Nm @2,500rpm

0-100km/h: approximately 11-seconds (estimate)

Top speed: approximately 170km/h (estimate)

Fuel capacity: 50-litres

Length: 4,089mm

Width: 1,994mm

Height: 1,555mm

Wheelbase: 2,589mm

Overhang: F/R: 846/654mm

Kerb Weight: 1,055kg (estimate)

Ground clearance: 173mm

Steering: Power-assisted rack and pinion

Brakes: F/R: Ventilated discs/drums

Tyres: 205/55R16


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Original article source: http://www.jordantimes.com/

Renault Triber AMT Offers SA Drivers More Convenience And Driving Pleasure

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With the eagerly awaited turbo model poised for introduction next year, Renault has announced the availability of an automatic version of the popular Triber.Introduced in India back in May, the self-shifter comes in the shape of the same five-speed automated manual (AMT) as used in the Kwid, but with an EDC-like gear lever instead of the rotary dial which also comes with a sequential shifting manual mode. Only available on the range-topping Prestige, the inclusion of the ‘box has not affected the outputs of the three-cylinder normally aspirated 1.0-litre engine, which still stands at 52kW/96Nm. The claimed fuel consumption is 5.5 L/100 km.
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Also unchanged from the manual is the specification sheet, which includes the eight-inch MediaNav touchscreen infotainment system with Apple CarPlay, Android Auto, Voice Recognition and satellite navigation, keyless entry, a separate air-conditioning panel for the second and third rows, a digital instrument cluster, push-button start, a reverse camera with rear parking sensors, six airbags and ABS with EBD.Still offering seven-seats in four configurations; the two-seater Camp, four-seat Surf, five-seat Life and seven-seat Tribe, the AMT, like with the rest of the Renault Triber range, comes standard with a five year/100 000 km warranty as well as a two year/30 000 km service plan and is priced from R226,900 at Group 1 Renault.
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In-Depth 2021 Renault Captur Review

Renault, like its French rival Peugeot, didn't quite nail the first attempt at a compact SUV. The first Captur was a Clio with some ride height and a new body and didn't quite make the cut for buyers. Partly because the original engine was borderline anaemic but secondly, it was really small.
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When you're French, you have more work to do in other markets.
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With more market-appropriate pricing, more space, a better interior and lots more tech, the second-generation Captur even rolls on a whole new platform, promising more space and better dynamics.
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Safety rating 5 stars
Engine Type 1.3L turbo
Fuel Type Unleaded petrol
Fuel Efficiency 6.6L/100km
Seating 4 seats
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Does it represent good value for money? What features does it come with?
The range comes with 17-inch wheels, a cloth interior, auto headlights, air-conditioning, Apple CarPlay and Android Auto on the 7.0-inch landscape-oriented touchscreen, full LED headlights (that’s a nice touch), front and rear parking sensors, a reversing camera and a space-saver spare.
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Step up to the higher-spec Captur to get extra safety gear, walk-away auto-locking, a heated leather steering wheel, auto wipers, two-tone paint option, climate control, keyless entry and start (with the Renault key card) and wireless phone charging.
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Then there's a big jump to the top model Captur. You get 18-inch wheels, a bigger 9.3-inch touchscreen in portrait mode, sat-nav, BOSE sound system, 7.0-inch digital dashboard display, LED interior lighting, 360-degree cameras and leather seats.
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The new Renault touchscreens are good and include Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, but I can only speak for the bigger 9.3-inch system which is similar to the Megane's.
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The new interior is a vast improvement over the old one. The plastics are way nicer and they have to be because hardly anyone has plastics as bad as that old car anymore.
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The new one has more comfortable seats, too, and I really like the revised dash. It feels much more modern, is better-designed and the little paddle for the audio controls has finally been updated and is way easier to use. It also clears the steering wheel of buttons, which I quite like.
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How practical is the space inside?
You get a massive boot to start with - bigger even than the fabled 408 litres of the Honda HR-V. Renault starts you with 422 litres and then adds underfloor storage. When you push the seats forward and include the hidey-hole under the false floor, you end up with 536 litres.
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Of course, that sliding will affect the rear legroom. When the rear seats are all the way back, this is a lot more comfortable than the old car, with more head and knee room, although it's no match for the Seltos or HR-V in that respect. Not far off, though.
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Fold the 60/40 split rear seats down and you have 1275 litres, a not-quite-flat floor and 1.57m long floor space, 11cm more than before.
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The French approach to cupholders continues. There are just two in this car, but they are at least useful rather than the frustratingly small ones in the outgoing model.
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Rear seat passengers don't get cupholders or an armrest, but there are bottle holders in all four doors and - joy of joys - air vents in the back. Bit weird to have no armrest even in the top-spec, though.
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What are the key stats for the engine and transmission?
All Capturs run the same 1.3-litre four-cylinder turbo-petrol engine delivering a mildly impressive 113kW at 5500rpm and 270Nm at 1800rpm, which should make for some reasonable speed.
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Both numbers are slightly higher than the original Captur, with power up by 3.0kW and torque by 20Nm.
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The front wheels are driven exclusively by Renault's seven-speed dual-clutch auto transmission.
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Weighing in at a maximum of 1381kg, this enthusiastic engine will push the Captur from 0-100km/h in 8.6 seconds, over half a second quicker than before and a touch quicker than most of its rivals.
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How much fuel does it consume?
Renault says the Captur's 1.3-litre engine will drink unleaded petrol at the rate of 6.6L/100km.
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That's a more sensible baseline figure than the previous car's sub-6.0 official combined cycle figure and after some web sleuthing appears to be the more accurate WLTP testing number.
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As we had the car for a brief time, the 7.5L/100km is probably not representative of real-world fuel use, but it's a good guide nonetheless.
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From the 48-litre tank, you should get 600 to 700km between fills.
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What safety equipment is fitted? What safety rating?
You get six airbags, ABS, stability and traction controls, forward AEB (up to 170km/h) with pedestrian and cyclist detection (10-80km/h), a reversing camera, rear parking sensors, forward collision warning, lane departure warning and lane-keep assist.
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If you want blind-spot monitoring and reverse cross-traffic alert on the entry-level, you have to step up to the higher-spec model or pay in to add the package.
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Given the marginal rear visibility and the ordinary resolution on the reversing camera, the omission of RCTA is annoying. I know Kia and various other rivals offer safety as extra, but this is an important feature.
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Euro NCAP awarded the Captur a maximum of five stars and ANCAP is offering the same rating.
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What does it cost to own? What warranty is offered?
Renault sends you home with a five year/unlimited-kilometre warranty and a year of roadside assist. Every time you return to a Renault dealer for service, you get a further year, to a maximum of five.
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The capped-price servicing runs for five years/150,000km. That suggests you can cover up to a massive 30,000km per year and only have to service it once, which is exactly what Renault reckons you can do. So yeah - service intervals are genuinely set at 12 months/30,000km.
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What's it like to drive?
Straight up, I will remind you of my fondness for French cars and the way they go about their business. Renault has been in strong form for some time now in the ride and handling department, even on tiny cars with rear torsion beam suspension.
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Where the previous Captur was let down was a common French failing - weak engines that work fine in the European market but don't go down so well in other markets.
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Even though I quite liked the old Captur, I got why nobody bought it (relatively speaking). This new one feels good from the second you park your bum in the driver's seat, with good, comfortable support, great vision forward (less so back, but that was the same in the old one) and the steering wheel even has a subtle flattened edge at the top if you have to set the wheel high.
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The 1.3-litre turbo is a bit grumbly and gristly on start-up and never really loses a slightly odd, reedy harmonic coming through the firewall, but it's a strong performer for its size and works (mostly) well with the seven-speed dual-clutch.
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Renault's old six-speeder was quite good and the seven works just fine except for a slight hesitation from step-off and is sometimes reluctant to kick down.
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I blame fuel-saving rather than a ham-fisted calibration because when you punch the weird flower button and switch to Sport mode, the Captur comes good.
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With a more aggressive transmission and a slightly livelier throttle, the Captur is much happier in this mode and so was I. The steering is light and direct and there's no real presence in the suspension for off-road use which is fine by me because it means it's great fun on the road.
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And despite being fun to drive, the ride is almost uniformly excellent. Like any car with torsion beams, it's unsettled by big potholes or those horrible rubber speed bumps, but so is an air-suspended German car.
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It's also fairly quiet except when you've got your foot to the floor and even then it's barely an inconvenience rather than a genuine problem.
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Verdict

The second-generation Captur's arrival coincides with the brand's transfer to a new distributor and a fiercely competitive market still bruised and battered from a shocking 2020.
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It certainly looks the part and is also priced the part. Without a doubt, the mid-spec (higher spec) is the one to go for unless you want the extra electro-trickery available on the top model, which is quite a lot more expensive.
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Setting aside my fondness for French cars, the new Renault Captur looks and feels more competitive in the compact SUV market. If you cover a lot of ground every year - or want the option to do so - you should really take a second look at the servicing structure, too, because in the Captur 30,000km in a year means a single service rather than three in turbo-engined rivals. That might be a bit niche, but even over the life of a car where you average 15,000km per year, it will make a difference.
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Original article from https://www.carsguide.com.au/

Cheapest Automatic Renault in SA (2021)

Looking for a chilled drive on a shoestring? We discuss the cheapest automatic Renault car available in South Africa.
If you are looking for the cheapest automatic Renault car in SA - sit back, relax and let the car do the work! Automatic cars have much to offer, especially if you live and travel within the confines of the city. Not only are automatic cars easier to drive but they also take the stress out of changing gears continuously, particularly if you crawl through traffic jams on a regular basis. Advances in transmission technology have also led to improvements in fuel efficiency, to the point where some automatic cars are actually more efficient than their manual siblings.
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Renault Kwid 1.0 Expression Automatic / Dynamique / Climber

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Renault introduced a revamped Kwid to market in 2019 and buyers now have the choice between 3 automatic Kwid derivatives and Renault has priced them all under R200k. The Kwid automatic is offered in either Expression, Dynamique and Climber guise. The Kwid is powered by the familiar 3-cylinder, 1.0-litre petrol engine that offers 50 kW and 91 Nm of torque and is equipped with an Automated Manual Transmission (AMT). Renault claims that the AMT version is more fuel-efficient than the manual with a claimed consumption figure of 4.4 L/100 km, making it the most fuel-efficient (claimed) car on this list.
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Key features
  • Safety: Driver and passenger airbag, ABS
  • Interior: 8-inch touchscreen infotainment system with Android Auto/Apple CarPlay, Bluetooth and USB support
  • Space: Boot space measures 279 litres
  • Service and warranty: 5-year/150 000km warranty
  • Pricing from R181,900 or R2,199pm*
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View the currently Renault prices on this and other automatic Renault cars sold in SA.
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*Pricing accurate as at August 2021.
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Article sourced from https://www.cars.co.za/motoring-news

Discussing The Expressive Exterior Design Of The Renault Clio

We take a look at the Renault Clio's exterior design and sources of inspiration. Laurens van den Acker, head of Groupe Renault’s Corporate Design, and Pierre Sabas, Head of External Design, explain how they based their work on the lines of the previous version to create a new Clio with modern, more expressive and dynamic features.
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Inspired By The Previous Generations
For several years now, design has become the primary factor in purchasing a Renault, a trend that has been particularly noteworthy with the Clio. Based on this success the sensual lines of the fourth generation of this icon have been preserved as the basis for those of the fifth, which has just been revealed.
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Our designers, however, were not satisfied with just one reference point, and have taken the best of each of the previous generations to create the best Clio ever.
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"The new Clio has "tout d’une grande" from the first generation, the habitability and comfort of the second, safety and performance from the third and finally, from the fourth, the design DNA of the Renault brand. " - Laurens van den Acker, Senior Vice President, Corporate Design, Groupe Renault
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Work began around the proportions of the new model - the Renault Clio has revised ratings and is more compact (-14 mm in length), lower (up to -30 mm in height), making it both sportier and more efficient.
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But it was also necessary to modernize its design to make it more expressive and dynamic. For that, a few details make all the difference.
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"We visually enhanced the car with a chrome signature on the bottom and around the windows. We also added more precision to the front wing with a graphic design that tightens the volumes and gives more precision to the overall line." - Pierre Sabas, Exterior designer
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Modernity And Expressiveness
The extensive work done on the front of the car gives more expressiveness and quality. The enlarged grille, enlarged logo, bumper air scoops, C-shaped headlamps, etc. have been designed and integrated with extreme precision.
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"The headlamps are ‘full LED’ from the first trim. They incorporate Renault's own C-shaped light signature; with extremely precise treatment, like jewellery." - Pierre Sabas
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In this quest for modernity, there are also some new colours with the Clio's symbolic Orange Valencia to the fore. It is the first tint in the world to be based on an Orange coloured varnish but it is unique in the automotive industry, bringing depth and a new shine to the bodywork.
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By combining this evolution of the exterior design with its revolution in interior design, the Clio is the pioneer of a new generation of Renault.
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